Acts of the Apostles

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[...]   For Paul had determined to sail past Ephesus, that he might not have to spend time in Asia   [...]

Acts of the Apostles: chapter 20, verse 16

Chapter 23, verse 19 - Chapter 24, verse 18

19 The commanding officer took him by the hand, and going aside, asked him privately, “What is it that you have to tell me?”
20 He said, “The Jews have agreed to ask you to bring Paul down to the council tomorrow, as though intending to inquire somewhat more accurately concerning him.
21 Therefore don’t yield to them, for more than forty men lie in wait for him, who have bound themselves under a curse neither to eat nor to drink until they have killed him. Now they are ready, looking for the promise from you.”
22 So the commanding officer let the young man go, charging him, “Tell no one that you have revealed these things to me.”
23 He called to himself two of the centurions, and said, “Prepare two hundred soldiers to go as far as Caesarea, with seventy horsemen, and two hundred men armed with spears, at the third hour of the night.”
24 He asked them to provide animals, that they might set Paul on one, and bring him safely to Felix the governor.
25 He wrote a letter like this:
26 “Claudius Lysias to the most excellent governor Felix: Greetings.
27 “This man was seized by the Jews, and was about to be killed by them, when I came with the soldiers and rescued him, having learned that he was a Roman.
28 Desiring to know the cause why they accused him, I brought him down to their council.
29 I found him to be accused about questions of their law, but not to be charged with anything worthy of death or of imprisonment.
30 When I was told that the Jews lay in wait for the man, I sent him to you immediately, charging his accusers also to bring their accusations against him before you. Farewell.”
31 So the soldiers, carrying out their orders, took Paul and brought him by night to Antipatris.
32 But on the next day they left the horsemen to go with him, and returned to the barracks.
33 When they came to Caesarea and delivered the letter to the governor, they also presented Paul to him.
34 When the governor had read it, he asked what province he was from. When he understood that he was from Cilicia, he said,
35 “I will hear you fully when your accusers also arrive.” He commanded that he be kept in Herod’s palace.
Chapter 24
1 After five days, the high priest, Ananias, came down with certain elders and an orator, one Tertullus. They informed the governor against Paul.
2 When he was called, Tertullus began to accuse him, saying, “Seeing that by you we enjoy much peace, and that excellent measures are coming to this nation,
3 we accept it in all ways and in all places, most excellent Felix, with all thankfulness.
4 But, that I don’t delay you, I entreat you to bear with us and hear a few words.
5 For we have found this man to be a plague, an instigator of insurrections among all the Jews throughout the world, and a ringleader of the sect of the Nazarenes.
6 He even tried to profane the temple, and we arrested him.
7 But the chief captain Lysias came, and with great violence took him away out of our hands commanding his accusers to come before thee.
8 By examining him yourself you may ascertain all these things of which we accuse him.”
9 The Jews also joined in the attack, affirming that these things were so.
10 When the governor had beckoned to him to speak, Paul answered, “Because I know that you have been a judge of this nation for many years, I cheerfully make my defense,
11 seeing that you can recognize that it is not more than twelve days since I went up to worship at Jerusalem.
12 In the temple they didn’t find me disputing with anyone or stirring up a crowd, either in the synagogues, or in the city.
13 Nor can they prove to you the things of which they now accuse me.
14 But this I confess to you, that after the Way, which they call a sect, so I serve the God of our fathers, believing all things which are according to the law, and which are written in the prophets
15 having hope toward God, which these also themselves look for, that there will be a resurrection of the dead, both of the just and unjust.
16 Herein I also practice always having a conscience void of offense toward God and men.
17 Now after some years, I came to bring gifts for the needy to my nation, and offerings
18 amid which certain Jews from Asia found me purified in the temple, not with a mob, nor with turmoil.